Editors

Geeta Aneja (Editor-in-Chief)

Geeta Aneja is a 5th year doctoral candidate in Educational Linguistics at PennGSE. Her research considers how the native speaker concept emerges and is reified through institutional structures and discourses in and beyond teacher education programs. She is also exploring how translingual writing and other initiatives can think beyond the native-nonnative dichotomy to create alternative ways of using and understanding language. Geeta has taught English in India, Peru, and Hong Kong, as well as at several Philadelphia non-profits and Drexel University. She previously earned a M.S.Ed. in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, also from Penn, as well as a B.A. in Linguistics and B.S. in Psychology from the University of Florida. 

Robert LeBlanc (Editor-in-Chief)

Robert Jean LeBlanc is a PhD candidate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, and the former editorial assistant to Educational Researcher. His work focuses on urban Catholic schools, literacy pedagogy, and ethnographic research. His research has appeared in journals such as the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, Written CommunicationEnglish JournalAnthropology & Education Quarterly, and Research in the Teaching of English (in press). Prior to coming to PennGSE, Robert earned a MA in Education and Society from McGill University, where he was a Research Assistant to the Paulo and Nita Freire International Project for Critical Pedagogy.

Frances O'Connell Rust (Faculty Advisor)

Dr. Rust is a Visiting Professor and Director of Teacher Education at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education. She is Professor Emeritus at New York University's Steinhardt School of Education where she was a professor of education between 1991 and 2007. Since 1985, she has directed undergraduate and graduate-level teacher education programs at Teachers College of Columbia University, Manhattanville College, Hofstra University, and NYU. She has published widely on topics related to teacher preparation and teacher quality. As well, she has written on teacher-driven action research and school improvement. Active in numerous professional organizations, she serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, Teacher Education Quarterly, and Teachers and Teaching – Theory and Practice.

Kira Baker-Doyle is a second-year doctoral student in the Teaching Learning and Curriculum program in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include beginning teacher experiences, teacher networks, and teacher inquiry. She is currently involved in documenting the Philadelphia Writing Project's New Teacher Initiative, as well as conducting research on the experience of first-year teachers in the School District of Philadelphia.

Judy Buchanan is a co-director of the National Writing Project, a professional development network for teachers that works to improve the teaching of writing in the nation's schools. Her previous experiences in education include working as a classroom teacher for twenty years in the School District of Philadelphia and, more recently, serving as the deputy director of the Philadelphia Education Fund. The particular interest she brings to this project is the intersection of research, practice, and policy in urban schools.

Emily Greytak is a doctoral student in the Education Policy program at the University of Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Education. She recently completed her Master's thesis on sexual abuse education. Her research interests include social justice education and program evaluation. She works as a research assistant for the Center for the Study of Boys' Lives and as a diversity trainer for the A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE Institute of the Anti-Defamation League.

Raymond Gunn is a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Education. As a Spencer Fellow, his research interest lies in urban education. He is specifically interested in the academic achievement of African American males in selective admission high schools. 

Katherine Schultz is an associate professor of education in the elementary teacher education program in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. A former teacher and principal, her research interests include urban teacher education; the study of literacy, discourse and identities; adolescent literacies in and out of school; and the education of girls and women. Her recently published book, Listening: A Framework for Teaching Across Differences, which documents her empirical research over the past decade in K-12 settings and teacher education, provides a conceptual framework for envisioning teaching as listening.

Anne Burns Thomas is a middle school teacher in the School District of Philadelphia. She is a doctoral candidate in the Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum Program of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include teacher retention and teacher networks.

Lalitha Vasudevan is a doctoral student in the Reading/Writing/Literacy program in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include youth and out-of-school literacies, and the intersections of literacies, technology and discourse in literacy education in urban contexts. Her dissertation explores the stories that adolescent boys have to tell using a range of literacies and multimodal practices.

Susan Goerlich Zief is a doctoral candidate in the Education Policy Program of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. A former middle school science teacher, she currently works on the evaluation of an after-school program in a local urban district and on a Campbell Collaboration review of the impacts of after school programs. Her research interests also include the integration of qualitative and quantitative methods in the evaluation of social policies.