Volume 5 Issue 2

School Safety under NCLB’s Unsafe School Choice Option

Bill Gastic and Josephine Ann Gasiewski

Abstract: 

Despite its flaws, the USCO created the conditions for an unprecedented national statement on school safety. This study asks: How do states conceptualize school safety? While critics have denounced the dizzying assortment of states’ persistently dangerous criteria, we argue that these differences have been grossly exaggerated. We contend that states’ shared orientations toward school safety can be described using a risk assessment perspective. This article introduces a framework that distills school violence in terms of severity and likelihood. Using this framework, we show how all states define school safety in terms of risk – specifically, as the maximum level of risk that is acceptable at a school that can still be considered safe.

School Safety under NCLB’s Unsafe School Choice Option

 

Structure, Power, and Discourse: An Analysis of Discipline in an Urban High School

Heather Hickman

Abstract: 

This article looks at one instance of a teacher attempting to discipline students for sexually profane heteronormative language and the resulting events that demonstrate a discipline over all discourses in the school. Using Fairclough’s critical discourse analysis (2005) to analyze the narrative, I argue that the discourse in the school reinforces a scalar net of power, which creates an organization much like a prison by structuring power in both an intertwined and hierarchical manner among other things (Morgan, 2006). That structure, represented by the metaphor of the prison, then reinforces a power over discourse that is oppressive. A major implication of the analysis is the need for a changed discourse in the school.

Introduction

Show me what you know: Pre-service city teachers and social justice in action

Kristien Marquez-Zenkov, Diane Corrigan, Christina Brockett & Sarah Lehrian

Abstract: 

Few current definitions and assessments of teacher “quality” have considered the social justice-oriented characteristics the authors consider most important in their work with future city teachers. This paper describes the masters licensure program with which the authors are involved, the portfolio assessment system this program utilizes to determine future urban teachers’ integration of this social justice concept, and examples of the evidence both pre-service teachers and graduates of this program have shared as evidence of their proficiency with this social justice-oriented notion.

Introduction